Glimpses from our beginning…

ROCKS FROM SPACE

Featuring Meteorites from The Curchin Collection

Glimpses from our beginning…

 

ROCKS FROM SPACE

Featuring Meteorites from The Curchin Collection

Photo courtesy of NASA

Allende

The Allende meteorite is the largest known carbonaceous chondrite meteor to fall to Earth. It is also …

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Allende Collection

NWA 3118

Carbonaceous chondrites contain some of the first materials that formed from our solar system. This dark rock has…

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NWA 3118 Collection

Tirhert

An extraterrestrial gabbro (coarse-grained basalt), the Tirhert meteorite from the asteroid Vesta fell…

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Tirhert Collection

D’Orbigny

The D’Orbigny meteorite was found near Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1979. It is classified as…

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D’Orbigny Collection

Campo del Cielo

The Campo del Cielo meteorite was first found in 1576 in Argentina. Since then, several fragments of this approximately 50 ton iron octahedrite have been…

Campo Img347_RmvBkgrd_500px

Campo del Cielo Collection

NWA 10153

Found in Northwest Africa in 2014, this meteorite is a Martian achondrite.  It is classified as a nakhlite and…

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NWA 10153 Collection

Sueilila 002

Simply put, it’s a little piece of Mars. Martian meteorites are classified into three main groups: shergottites, nakhlites, and chassignites. Sueilila 002 is an…

Meteorites

Sueilila 002 Collection

John M. Curchin

RRCC Astronomy Instructor, age 61

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About John

Like many of his generation, John grew up watching humans put footprints on the moon, destined to become a scientist. Graduating with degrees in geology and geophysics, his first published paper actually looked for a correlation between the lunar tides and quakes here on Earth (there is none). After a stint working for oil companies seeking petroleum (he found none), John followed in the footsteps of his mother and became a teacher, currently exploring the wonders of the night sky with students from Red Rocks Community College. Due to an inevitable collision of interests, about 25 years ago John discovered that rocks from space, meteorites, were available for public purchase. At that time, he had none, but now owns over 500 individual specimens, as well as approximately 1500 meteorites in thin section, from which these images have been created. 

Creating an ‘image in thin section’ is itself a unique and fascinating way to explore nature. Geologists routinely slice a rock wafer thin, and then epoxy it to a glass slide, from which it can be investigated with a ‘petrographic’ microscope. John joined forces with fellow petrographer Fred Olsen in 1999 to acquire, and eventually sell MITS, Meteorites In Thin Section. They can be found for sale at their website, MeteoriteTS.com, along with images, explanations and links to other meteorite-themed websites. Please feel free to contact John with any questions or suggestions at curch@msn.com

John M. Curchin

RRCC Astronomy Instructor, age 61

John Curchin_653x801_crop lev

About John

Like many of his generation, John grew up watching humans put footprints on the moon, destined to become a scientist. Graduating with degrees in geology and geophysics, his first published paper actually looked for a correlation between the lunar tides and quakes here on Earth (there is none). After a stint working for oil companies seeking petroleum (he found none), John followed in the footsteps of his mother and became a teacher, currently exploring the wonders of the night sky with students from Red Rocks Community College. Due to an inevitable collision of interests, about 25 years ago John discovered that rocks from space, meteorites, were available for public purchase. At that time, he had none, but now owns over 500 individual specimens, as well as approximately 1500 meteorites in thin section, from which these images have been created. 

Creating an ‘image in thin section’ is itself a unique and fascinating way to explore nature. Geologists routinely slice a rock wafer thin, and then epoxy it to a glass slide, from which it can be investigated with a ‘petrographic’ microscope. John joined forces with fellow petrographer Fred Olsen in 1999 to acquire, and eventually sell MITS, Meteorites In Thin Section. They can be found for sale at their website, MeteoriteTS.com, along with images, explanations and links to other meteorite-themed websites. Please feel free to contact John with any questions or suggestions at curch@msn.com

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